Person

Daniel J Mathew

Assistant Professor | Animal Science
Overview

I grew up on a family row crop and swine farm in North West Indiana before my family moved to East Tennessee. There, we raised cattle and owned a small beef cow-calf farm. My interests in animal science and reproductive physiology sparked from my experiences on the family farm and during my undergraduate studies at the University of Tennessee. Animal agriculture depends on animal reproduction and problems associated with fertility greatly reduce farm productivity and income. Ultimately, this has a negative impact on U.S. and global agriculture. Pregnancy failure resulting from early embryonic mortality or loss, is a major reproductive issue in large animal livestock. Depending on species, the rate of early embryonic mortality or pregnancy failure may be as high as 60%. Late embryonic or fetal loss can occur thereafter, although at a lesser rate. A successful pregnancy requires complex developmental processes within the embryo and interactions between the embryo and the female reproductive tract. Our research program aims to develop safe technologies in cattle, sheep and swine that optimize these processes or identify and eliminate factors that disrupt them. Our current research interests include: 1) methods to improve in vitro produced embryo health and survival, 2) identifying embryonic and maternal genetic products and/or interactions that promote a successful pregnancy and 3) characterizing how disease and environment induced stress reduce fertility with the goal of developing strategies to eliminate or control their impact.

Research Focus

Bovine Reproductive Physiology and Fertility

Teaching Focus

Animal Anatomy and Physiology

Courses
Below are courses taught during the current or past three academic years. Consult Timetable for the most current listing of courses and instructor(s).

AGNR 512 - Teaching Internship in Agriculture and Natural Resources
1 credit hour(s)

Supervised experience in teaching - test preparation and evaluation of agriculture students.

Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 2 hours for MS students and maximum 4 hours for PhD students.

Other Instructors: Kojima, Cheryl Jean | Buckley, David S | Prado, Maria | Rius, Agustin G | McLean, Amanda | Yu, Edward | Grant, Jerome F | Yang, Sheng-I | Muller, Lisa Irene | Walton, Jonathan | Cavasos, Kevin Eric | Larson, James Arlan | Eash, Neal | Stephens, Carrie Ann | McLean, Kyle | Kerro Dego, Oudessa | Mason, Katie | Essington, Michael E | Edwards, J. Lannett | Beever, Jon | Zhao, Yang | Trout Fryxell, Rebecca Tiffany | Schrick, Neal | Duncan, Lori Allison | Chen, Ricky Xuqi

ANSC 220 - Animal Anatomy and Physiology
3 credit hour(s)

Skeleton and joints; muscles; blood and microcirculation; the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems; demonstrations of physical-chemical phenomena. Students must complete ANSC 220 with a grade of C- or better in order to remain in the major of Animal Science.

Contact Hour Distribution: 2 hours and 1 lab.
(RE) Prerequisite(s) : BIOL 101*-BIOL 102* or BIOL 150*-BIOL 159*.

ANSC 494 - Animal Science Teaching Assistant
1 credit hour(s)

Assist the primary instructor in laboratory instruction and demonstrations.

Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 3 hours.
Registration Permission: Consent of department.

Other Instructors: Kojima, Cheryl Jean | McLean, Amanda | Prado, Maria | Edwards, J. Lannett

Daniel J Mathew image
234 Brehm Animal Science Building
2506 River Dr
Knoxville, TN 37996-4574
Education and Training
  • PhD, Animal Sciences, General, Univ Missouri Columbia*, 2014
  • MS, Animal Sciences, General, Univ Missouri Columbia*, 2009
  • BS, Animal Sciences, General, Univ of Tennessee Knoxville*, 2006

Daniel J Mathew

Assistant Professor | Animal Science
Daniel J Mathew image
234 Brehm Animal Science Building
2506 River Dr
Knoxville, TN 37996-4574
Education and Training
  • PhD, Animal Sciences, General, Univ Missouri Columbia*, 2014
  • MS, Animal Sciences, General, Univ Missouri Columbia*, 2009
  • BS, Animal Sciences, General, Univ of Tennessee Knoxville*, 2006
Overview

I grew up on a family row crop and swine farm in North West Indiana before my family moved to East Tennessee. There, we raised cattle and owned a small beef cow-calf farm. My interests in animal science and reproductive physiology sparked from my experiences on the family farm and during my undergraduate studies at the University of Tennessee. Animal agriculture depends on animal reproduction and problems associated with fertility greatly reduce farm productivity and income. Ultimately, this has a negative impact on U.S. and global agriculture. Pregnancy failure resulting from early embryonic mortality or loss, is a major reproductive issue in large animal livestock. Depending on species, the rate of early embryonic mortality or pregnancy failure may be as high as 60%. Late embryonic or fetal loss can occur thereafter, although at a lesser rate. A successful pregnancy requires complex developmental processes within the embryo and interactions between the embryo and the female reproductive tract. Our research program aims to develop safe technologies in cattle, sheep and swine that optimize these processes or identify and eliminate factors that disrupt them. Our current research interests include: 1) methods to improve in vitro produced embryo health and survival, 2) identifying embryonic and maternal genetic products and/or interactions that promote a successful pregnancy and 3) characterizing how disease and environment induced stress reduce fertility with the goal of developing strategies to eliminate or control their impact.

Research Focus

Bovine Reproductive Physiology and Fertility

Teaching Focus

Animal Anatomy and Physiology

Courses
Below are courses taught during the current or past three academic years. Consult Timetable for the most current listing of courses and instructor(s).

AGNR 512 - Teaching Internship in Agriculture and Natural Resources
1 credit hour(s)

Supervised experience in teaching - test preparation and evaluation of agriculture students.

Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 2 hours for MS students and maximum 4 hours for PhD students.

Other Instructors: Kojima, Cheryl Jean | Buckley, David S | Prado, Maria | Rius, Agustin G | McLean, Amanda | Yu, Edward | Grant, Jerome F | Yang, Sheng-I | Muller, Lisa Irene | Walton, Jonathan | Cavasos, Kevin Eric | Larson, James Arlan | Eash, Neal | Stephens, Carrie Ann | McLean, Kyle | Kerro Dego, Oudessa | Mason, Katie | Essington, Michael E | Edwards, J. Lannett | Beever, Jon | Zhao, Yang | Trout Fryxell, Rebecca Tiffany | Schrick, Neal | Duncan, Lori Allison | Chen, Ricky Xuqi

ANSC 220 - Animal Anatomy and Physiology
3 credit hour(s)

Skeleton and joints; muscles; blood and microcirculation; the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems; demonstrations of physical-chemical phenomena. Students must complete ANSC 220 with a grade of C- or better in order to remain in the major of Animal Science.

Contact Hour Distribution: 2 hours and 1 lab.
(RE) Prerequisite(s) : BIOL 101*-BIOL 102* or BIOL 150*-BIOL 159*.

ANSC 494 - Animal Science Teaching Assistant
1 credit hour(s)

Assist the primary instructor in laboratory instruction and demonstrations.

Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 3 hours.
Registration Permission: Consent of department.

Other Instructors: Kojima, Cheryl Jean | McLean, Amanda | Prado, Maria | Edwards, J. Lannett